Little Girl's Mostly Linux Blog

July 17, 2018

MATE – Vertical Panels

Filed under: News — mostlylinux @ 10:23 pm

MATE – Vertical Panels

I’ve sometimes heard people say that MATE can’t provide vertical taskbars panel, so I thought I’d check if that’s so. It seems that it can (as can be seen here), and it’s just a matter of either changing the orientation of an existing taskbars panel to left or right instead of top or bottom or adding a new taskbars panel and choosing left or right as its orientation. It’s not quite that simple, though, as will be seen in the sections below this one, but as a quick demonstration, here’s my initial experiment. Please forgive the hot pink. That’s just how I roll.

Experiment 1

In the following screenshot, you can see MATE with a bottom and left panel. I’ve also opened the properties on both panels so you can see the choices I made. Last, but not least, I populated the left panel with a few non-default applets to demonstrate that it’s an ordinary panel.

In the following screenshot, you can see that you can have as many panels as you like (or at least as many as your hardware will support) on any or all of the edges of the monitor. As an example, I stacked two of them on the left in this next screenshot while leaving the bottom one in place. I also included the opened properties for each of them so you can see the choices I made:

In case anyone is wondering, I use the Oxymentary icon set.

Further testing is in order

Now that I’ve realized what the actual goal is, which is to see if vertical panels can properly display the panel applets in them, I did some further testing. Below are a series of screenshots I took in a virtual machine with a Live CD of Ubuntu MATE without changing its display properties. As a result, the resolution is pretty low, and the numbers you see in these screenshots will likely be different if you try this on a full-blown desktop.

Experiment 2

In this experiment, I deleted the bottom panel and then changed the orientation of the top panel to the left without altering any of its settings. Only default panel applets were used.

Screenshot 1: In the following screenshot, you see how MATE looks after booting into it and getting rid of the introductory pop-up). Notice the two panels, one on top and one on the bottom. Note that each panel was 24 pixels high, its applets were consistent in size, and their orientation was consistent, with all of them being horizontal.

Screenshot 2: In the following screenshot, I deleted the bottom panel and changed the top panel’s orientation to the left without changing its size, so it was still at 24 pixels. The applet sizes were consistent, but I immediately lost access to some of them, and the orientation of the applets wasn’t consistent, with some being vertical and some horizontal.

Screenshot 3: In the following screenshot, I increased the width of the panel to its maximum, which was 160. The applet sizes were not all consistent, with some of them being small and some huge. This gave me some more of my applets back. The orientation of the applets wasn’t consistent, with some being vertical and some horizontal.

Screenshot 4: In the following screenshot, I reduced the width of the panel to its minimum, which was 17. This made me lose access to the applets I had with the increased width, solved the inconsistent size issue by sizing everything the same way, and the orientation of the applets wasn’t consistent, with some being vertical and some horizontal.

Screenshot 5: In this screenshot, I unchecked the expand box while leaving the panel at its minimum size, which is 17. I got full access to all the applets, they were all consistently sized, and the orientation of the applets wasn’t consistent, with some being vertical and some horizontal.

Screenshot 6: In this screenshot, I left the expand box unchecked and expanded the panel to the largest possible size without making it go beyond the screen borders, which, in this case, was 88. I still had access to all the applets, the size was now inconsistent again, and the orientation of the applets wasn’t consistent, with some being vertical and some horizontal.

Screenshot 7: In this screenshot, I left the expand box unchecked and expanded the panel to the largest possible size, which was 160. I immediately lost access to some of the applets, the size was inconsistent, and the orientation of the applets wasn’t consistent, with some being vertical and some horizontal.

Screenshot 8: In this screenshot, I left the expand box unchecked, changed the panel’s size to its minimum, which was 17, and changed its orientation to the top again. I got full access to all of the applets, they were all consistently sized, and the orientation of the applets was consistent, with all of them being horizontal.

Screenshot 9: In this screenshot, I left the expand box unchecked, changed the panel’s size to its maximum, which was 120, and left its orientation at the top. I still had full access to all of the applets, but they were not all consistently sized, and the orientation of the applets was consistent, with all of them being horizontal.

Still further testing is in order

Experiment 3

In this experiment, I copied all of the applets from the bottom panel to the top panel, deleted the bottom panel, and then changed the orientation of the top panel to the left. Only default panel applets, from both panels, were used.

Screenshot 1a: In the following screenshot, you see how MATE looks after booting into it and getting rid of the introductory pop-up). Notice the two panels, one on top and one on the bottom. Note that each panel was 24 pixels high, its applets were consistent in size, and their orientation was consistent, with all of them being horizontal.

Screenshot 2a: In the following screenshot, I copied all of the applets from the bottom panel to the top panel and deleted the bottom panel. I didn’t change any of the top panel’s settings, so its orientation was still at the top and it was 24 pixels high. I had access to all the applets, the size of the applets was consistent, and their orientation was horizontal.

Screenshot 3a: In the following screenshot, I changed the orientation of the top panel to the left without changing its width, so it was 24 pixels wide. The applet sizes were consistent, but I immediately lost access to some of them, and the orientation of the applets wasn’t consistent, with some being vertical and some horizontal.

Screenshot 4a: In the following screenshot, I increased the left panel’s width to 62. This gave me access to fewer applets, some of which were overlapping, the applet sizes were inconsistent, and the orientation of the applets wasn’t consistent, with some being vertical and some horizontal.

I did end up making the panel bigger, but didn’t include that here since doing so caused me to lose more and more access to the applets and caused them to overlap even more. It’s pretty obvious to me that panels in MATE are messy and need some love.


Obligatory Happy Ending

And they all lived happily ever after. The end.

Advertisements

Blog at WordPress.com.